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 BOKAMOSO  Johannesburg, South Africa - December 2018  Bokamoso (“the future” in Sotho language) represents the visual counterpart to a residency between South African music collective The Brother Moves On, a multi-genre performative art project, and Slovenian pianist and producer Bowrain. The collective which has gained international renown for their blending of musical, political and art boundaries took a special interest in Bowrain who they met thanks to the Druga godba festival which hosted them in May 2018.  A series of portraits capture vibrant personalities, hierarchies, light piano resonance, gentrification and melancholic realities in Johannesburg’s Maboneng Precinct. Maboneng (a Sotho word meaning “place of light”) is a former no-go zone that has been transforming into a creative hub and urban attraction in an unpredictable and socially segregated city.  The separation is shown through photographs, with the environment’s colorfulness and black and white graphics of its subjects, which coincide with the expression of The Brother Moves On in their historical, political, social and creative perspectives.  Photos shed light on the difficulties and hopefulness of an unheard voice for a brighter future. Contrary to the media agenda, it displays South Africa in a brighter perspective.
       
     
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 BOKAMOSO  Johannesburg, South Africa - December 2018  Bokamoso (“the future” in Sotho language) represents the visual counterpart to a residency between South African music collective The Brother Moves On, a multi-genre performative art project, and Slovenian pianist and producer Bowrain. The collective which has gained international renown for their blending of musical, political and art boundaries took a special interest in Bowrain who they met thanks to the Druga godba festival which hosted them in May 2018.  A series of portraits capture vibrant personalities, hierarchies, light piano resonance, gentrification and melancholic realities in Johannesburg’s Maboneng Precinct. Maboneng (a Sotho word meaning “place of light”) is a former no-go zone that has been transforming into a creative hub and urban attraction in an unpredictable and socially segregated city.  The separation is shown through photographs, with the environment’s colorfulness and black and white graphics of its subjects, which coincide with the expression of The Brother Moves On in their historical, political, social and creative perspectives.  Photos shed light on the difficulties and hopefulness of an unheard voice for a brighter future. Contrary to the media agenda, it displays South Africa in a brighter perspective.
       
     

BOKAMOSO

Johannesburg, South Africa - December 2018

Bokamoso (“the future” in Sotho language) represents the visual counterpart to a residency between South African music collective The Brother Moves On, a multi-genre performative art project, and Slovenian pianist and producer Bowrain. The collective which has gained international renown for their blending of musical, political and art boundaries took a special interest in Bowrain who they met thanks to the Druga godba festival which hosted them in May 2018.

A series of portraits capture vibrant personalities, hierarchies, light piano resonance, gentrification and melancholic realities in Johannesburg’s Maboneng Precinct. Maboneng (a Sotho word meaning “place of light”) is a former no-go zone that has been transforming into a creative hub and urban attraction in an unpredictable and socially segregated city.

The separation is shown through photographs, with the environment’s colorfulness and black and white graphics of its subjects, which coincide with the expression of The Brother Moves On in their historical, political, social and creative perspectives.

Photos shed light on the difficulties and hopefulness of an unheard voice for a brighter future. Contrary to the media agenda, it displays South Africa in a brighter perspective.